What are you currently reading?

  • Currently, I am reading Smile or Die by Barbara Ehrenreich, it is alright. It basically raises concern on how positive thinking can get distorted into the land of delusion where anything bad that happens to you, even illness, are your fault and mean you didn't have a positive attitude. Looking for the best outcome ignoring what are the most likely ones and prepare accordingly. The book has mixed reviews and I feel like the author jumps to extremes to impulse her views but it is a nudge to make you more aware and get critical about what we're being fed.


    Fashion, Faith and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe, by Roger Penrose
    A brilliant scientist, he has worked with Stephen Hawking previously. This book deals with string theory, quantum mechanics and cosmology, and what we might be forgetting or doing wrong in these fields. Coincidentally, he visited Oslo yesterday to promote the same book, and I got to ask him a question and got my book signed.

    That's pretty cool. Congrats on getting the book signed.

  • Recently discovered two books that I adore.

    The Organised Mind

    by Daniel J. Levitin


    Most of us want to be more oganised, but this is the only book that has succeeded for me, because it backs it up with the modern neuroscience. Neuroscience is a big fascination for me right now, so it ws the perfect time to stumble on this. But even beyond how to be more organised, it goes into ways of making your brain healthier and happier. With very little effort, I now get twice as much done and feel half as tired. Amazing.


    A Completely Impartial History Of Britain
    by John O'Farrell


    If you know a thing or two about history, his sarcastic parody of events really jumps out. Things like 1649: Charles I sentenced to be beheaded. Head sewn back on after appeal. If you don't know the events, is just ludicrous and maybe midly amusing, but it is actually what happened in a roundabout kind of way. Having my understanding of history irreverently shat on is very refresing. I know the facts, but not "put like that". Still a great introduction to British history if you want to get into the subject.

  • The Organised Mind
    by Daniel J. Levitin


    Most of us want to be more oganised, but this is the only book that has succeeded for me, because it backs it up with the modern neuroscience. Neuroscience is a big fascination for me right now, so it ws the perfect time to stumble on this. But even beyond how to be more organised, it goes into ways of making your brain healthier and happier. With very little effort, I now get twice as much done and feel half as tired. Amazing.


    Sounds pretty intriguing to me. I might benefit from it and maybe recover a piece of me I feel I lost while growing up.

  • I got two sci-fi books from the library that I'm reading right now:


    The Gods Themselves by Isaav Asimov
    The Last Theorem by Arthur C. Clarke & Frederik Pohl


    I recently rented The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin. Didn't get through it in the allotted time, and I might rent it again later.

  • Yeah, I've certainly got a type I suppose. =P


    I finished it, actually. It was a solid adaptation of the idea behind Charlie and the Chocolate Factory into a game format. Also Kiel is good people, and the art was striking. I enjoy the juxtaposition of the cute and the violent.


    I'm currently reading "England Upturn'd," which is disappointing so far, but we'll see how it goes.

  • Well, like the title says, discuss what you are currently reading.


    I'm currently reading 2 books at the present moment. I'm reading "Pet Sematary" by Stephen King in e-book form on my Kindle. I'm also reading "The Chalk Man" by C. J. Tudor in paperback. Both of them have been good so far but I haven't finished either one yet.

  • I bought the audiobook of Pet Semetary on Audible that is read by Michael C Hall who played Dexter on the TV show Dexter.


    How creepy is the book?


    The 1989 movie I saw when I was in kindergarten was the scariest movie I had ever seen.

  • Stephen's work is fascinating. My first bump into it was reading The Shining but I was already in my 20s by that point and didn't get very scared. This is why King said he was so reluctant to write a sequel to it, because he figured a load of people were scared witless by it in their teens and childhood and by the time he wrote the sequel, those same people wouldn't be so easily scared and then they'd blame the book.


    Still, I thought The Shining was genius, the best characterisation I've ever read (stfu Google Autocorrect, I'll put an 's' instead of a 'z' in that word if I want! viva la Grande Bretagne)


    Right now, reading Lady Of The Rivers by Phillipa Gregory and Pax Britannicus: A Century Of Empire by James Morris.

  • Misery is probably my favorite of Stephen King, movie and book. It feels like a more tangible fear for me to be stuck at the mercy of another human being. That said, I have tried to read the popular ones like the Carrie and the Shinning. I think too the Shinning was pretty good. i like how it'd explain the kids fear and the what was going in the head of different characters.

    Right now I am reading 1984 by George Orwell, it was a longtime coming I had in my bucket list. I wanted to read this book at least once before I die, so I am close to manage that. I can see why many people can draw parallelism with today society, it can put you to think and question how much of what you know is really true and how much is just stuff you believe because that's what everyone around you says it is. The prose is outdated so it might not flow as good as a more recent book, but it is not as disruptive either, I find I can ease myself into it.

  • Man, 1984 was huge, I remember reading it as part of A-level (between normal school and university). I think the comparisons to modern society are a little fanciful but maybe that's another discussion. The one place left that is truly, properly 1984-like is North Korea. They even have hate hours where they are required to scream at pictures of American flags and things.

  • Claraviolet What sorta book is it? Usually 9-book series are either Fantasy or SciFi :P



    I've been reading Sam Delaney's Dhalgren, which is not very enjoyable at all. I kinda hate it, actually, but it makes me think, which I appreciate.

    It's an 800+ page behemoth about a city which has undergone some catastrophe, and is now cut off from the rest of the world in most ways. Like a miniature, localized apocalypse. The whole thing becomes gradually more disjointed as you go along and the protagonist goes crazy.

  • Claraviolet What sorta book is it? Usually 9-book series are either Fantasy or SciFi :P



    I've been reading Sam Delaney's Dhalgren, which is not very enjoyable at all. I kinda hate it, actually, but it makes me think, which I appreciate.

    It's an 800+ page behemoth about a city which has undergone some catastrophe, and is now cut off from the rest of the world in most ways. Like a miniature, localized apocalypse. The whole thing becomes gradually more disjointed as you go along and the protagonist goes crazy.

    It's a detective series of about 9 books.

    I forgot about the author but I will try to get more information about it

  • Claraviolet Is it Lisa Gardner?



    I've also been reading "Axiom's End" by Lindsay Ellis, as I am a huge fan of hers. It's a good story, slightly clunky in places, but fun and thoughtful, and better than any other art I've seen from someone who built their reputation on being a critic.